Menu

Understanding Home Health Care


About Me

Understanding Home Health Care

When my mom got sick, we knew that things were critical. We were really concerned about her ability to endure the treatments, and we started thinking about what we could do to make her more comfortable. After talking with her medical practitioner, we realized that home health care might be best for her condition. It was really tricky to decide to move her to home and start focusing on her quality of life, but we knew it was the right choice to make. Within a few weeks, she had deteriorated significantly, but she was comfortable and happy. This blog is all about understanding home health care.

Categories

Archive

Latest Posts

What To Know About Informal Caregivers And Senior Home Care
20 February 2019

Senior home care tends to bring certain ideas to m

Here Is Why In Home Senior Care May Be A Good Fit For Grandma
25 July 2018

As grandma continues to age, her needs will contin

Is Your Loved One With Alzheimer's Coming Home After Sustaining An Injury?
14 March 2018

While your loved one's Alzheimer's disease is in t

3 Health Conditions That May Warrant A Doctor's Visit
29 December 2017

If you are or will be taking care of a loved one a

Tips For Meeting The Health Needs Of Elderly Patients
19 November 2017

Elderly individuals will have a number of health n

3 Signs You And Your Parent With Dementia Require Professional Help

From cooking and cleaning to keeping them safe, the challenges of caring for a parent with dementia are easy to see. Unfortunately, you may feel the need to focus solely on your new role as a caregiver, reducing time spent with your family or on your career. While this natural role reversal is common, caring for your parent does not have to wreak havoc on your physical and emotional well-being. If you are experiencing one of the following, it is time to hire a professional to care for your parent with dementia.

Frustration Is Growing

Watching a parent go through the stages of dementia can be overwhelming. Not only will you feel sad, anxious, and tired, but your parent will also go through an emotional roller coaster. Due to these emotional changes, you may feel stress and frustration.

In some instances, this frustration can cause you to show anger in a verbal or physical manner towards your parent. Learning the signs that your frustration is growing can help reduce any anger towards your loved one. Here are a few signs that you are beginning to feel frustrated or angry:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Tightness in chest
  • Stomach cramps
  • Headache
  • Knot in throat

When you notice one of these signs, you need a break. Hiring a professional for elderly care to come in and care for your parent for just a few hours can offer you enormous relief.

Injuries Are Becoming Common

Even if your parent lives in the same home as you, supervising them each minute of every day is not possible. While surprising to hear, more than 60 percent of patients with Alzheimer's or another form of dementia will wander, increasing the risk of injuries that can be serious.

Ensuring your parent has 24/7 care and supervision is important for reducing the risk of wandering away, which can prevent these injuries. If you notice unexplained bumps, bruises, cuts, or burns on your parent, it may be time to bring in around-the-clock care.

Your Own Family/Home/Career Is Suffering

Your parent will require a great deal of care. Bathing, dressing, feeding, and protecting a person with dementia will require time, energy, and money. While family should be considered a priority, caring for your parent should not negatively affect your own family, home, or career.

Juggling the needs of your children and spouse, household chores, and work tasks with the needs of your parent are possible. However, hiring professional help can make your life a lot less stressful.

It is important to note that you should never feel guilty about hiring nurses to help care for your parent. With this guide, you will know when it is time to invest in professional help for not only your parent, but also for you and your family.